Shakespeare | Sonnet 10 | Text | A Critical Study

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Shakespeare | Sonnet 10 | Text | A Critical Study

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Shakespeare  Sonnet 10  Text  A Critical Study

Shakespeare | Sonnet 10 | A Critical Study

(Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10: Text, Analytical Study | Word Notes | Faqs)

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10 – Text

For shame! deny that thou bear’st love to any,
Who for thyself art so unprovident.
Grant, if thou wilt, thou art beloved of many,
But that thou none lovest is most evident;
For thou art so possess’d with murderous hate
That ‘gainst thyself thou stick’st not to conspire.
Seeking that beauteous roof to ruinate
Which to repair should be thy chief desire.
O, change thy thought, that I may change my mind!
Shall hate be fairer lodged than gentle love?
Be, as thy presence is, gracious and kind,
Or to thyself at least kind-hearted prove:
Make thee another self, for love of me,
That beauty still may live in thine or thee.

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10 – An Analytical Study

Thematic Analysis:

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10 is a passionate plea to the beloved, urging them to change their ways and embrace love rather than hate. The sonnet criticizes the beloved for being unprovident in love and instead being consumed by hateful thoughts that lead them to self-destructive behavior. The speaker urges the beloved to embrace love and kindness, for the sake of both themselves and their relationship.

The sonnet begins with a bold and shaming question, “For shame! deny that thou bear’st love to any,” which immediately sets the accusatory tone of the poem. The speaker claims that the beloved is unprovident in love, meaning that they are not providing for themselves or their partner in a loving and caring way. Despite being loved by many, the beloved does not love anyone, which is most evident in their murderous hate towards themselves.

The speaker describes how the beloved is so consumed by hate that they conspire against themselves, seeking to ruin their own beauty and happiness. The “beauteous roof” that the beloved seeks to “ruinate” is a metaphor for their own physical and emotional being, which should be their chief desire to repair. However, their self-destructive tendencies prevent them from doing so.

The sonnet then takes a hopeful turn, with the speaker urging the beloved to change their ways so that the speaker may change their mind. The speaker argues that hate should not be fairer lodged than gentle love, and urges the beloved to be gracious and kind as their presence suggests. The speaker implores the beloved to make themselves a better version of themselves, one that is kind-hearted and loving, for the sake of their relationship and the continuation of beauty in the world.

Literary Devices:

Metaphor: The “beauteous roof” that the beloved seeks to “ruinate” is a metaphor for their own physical and emotional being, which should be their chief desire to repair.

Alliteration: “Seeking that beauteous roof to ruinate / Which to repair should be thy chief desire.”

Repetition: The repetition of “kind” in “gracious and kind” and “kind-hearted prove” emphasizes the importance of kindness in the sonnet.

Apostrophe: The sonnet is an apostrophe, or a direct address to the beloved. The speaker implores the beloved to change their ways and embrace love for the sake of their relationship. 0 0 0.

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10 – Word Notes

Here are some of the key words and phrases in this sonnet and their meanings:

unprovident: not providing for the future; not looking ahead

belov’d: loved

evident: clear; obvious.

possess’d: controlled; dominated

murderous hate: extreme hatred; a desire to harm or destroy.

stick’st not to conspire: do not hesitate to plot or scheme.

beauteous roof: a metaphor for oneself, specifically one’s physical body or being.

chief desire: main or primary goal or wish

change thy thought: change your way of thinking or mindset

lodg’d: housed; contained

gracious: polite; courteous

kind: caring; considerate

kind-hearted: compassionate; sympathetic

another self: a version of oneself that is different or improved

beauty: physical attractiveness or goodness. 0 0 0.

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10 – Faqs

Here are some FAQs on Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10

Q: What is Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10 about?
A: Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10 is part of his series of sonnets known as the “fair youth” sonnets. In this sonnet, Shakespeare urges the young man to have children in order to ensure that his beauty and virtues are passed down to future generations.

Q: What is the structure of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10?
A: Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10 is structured as a typical English sonnet, with three quatrains (four-line stanzas) followed by a final rhyming couplet (two-line stanza). The rhyme scheme is abab cdcd efef gg.

Q: What is the tone of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10?
A: The tone of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10 is both persuasive and urgent. Shakespeare is urging the young man to have children while he is still young and beautiful, and he uses a variety of rhetorical devices to make his argument.

Q: What are some of the rhetorical devices used in Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10?
A: Shakespeare uses a variety of rhetorical devices in Sonnet 10, including repetition, personification, and metaphor. He repeats the phrase “make thee another self” throughout the sonnet to emphasize the importance of the young man having children. He personifies time as a “bloody tyrant” who will eventually destroy the young man’s beauty. He also uses the metaphor of a “glass” to describe the young man’s beauty, suggesting that it is fragile and fleeting.

Q: What is the theme of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10?
A: The theme of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10 is the importance of procreation and the passing down of virtues to future generations. Shakespeare argues that the young man’s beauty and virtues will be lost forever if he does not have children to carry on his legacy.

Q: What is the significance of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10?
A: Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10 is significant because it is part of his larger body of work that explores themes of love, beauty, and mortality. It is also significant because it highlights the importance of procreation in Shakespeare’s time, and reflects the cultural beliefs and values of the Elizabethan era. ***

 

N.B. This article originally belongs to the book entitled ‘Shakespeare’s Sonnets-Critical Studies‘ by Menonim Menonimus.

Books of Literary Criticism by M. Menonimus:

  1. World Short Story Criticism
  2. World Poetry Criticism
  3. World Drama Criticism
  4. World Novel Criticism
  5. World Essay Criticism
  6. Indian English Poetry Criticism
  7. Indian English Poets and Poetry Chief Features
  8. Emily Dickinson’s Poetry-A Thematic Study
  9. Walt Whitman’s Poetry-A Thematic Study
  10. Critical Essays on English Poetry
  11. Tawfiq al-Hakim’s Novel: Return of the Spirit-An Analytical Study
  12. Tawfiq al-Hakim’s Novel: ‘Yawmiyyat Naib Fil Arayaf’-An Analytical Study
  13. Analytical Studies of Some Arabic Short Stories
  14. A Brief History of Arabic Literature: Pre-Islamic Period (500 AD-622 AD)
  15. A Brief History of Arabic Literature: Early Islamic Period (622 AD-661 AD)
  16. Reviews on William Shakespeare’s Works
  17. Reviews of Charles Dickens’ Works
  18. Reviews of John Milton’s Literary Works
  19. Reviews of Some Iconic Travelogues
  20. Shakespeare’s Sonnets-Critical Studies

Additional Searches:

  1. Shakespeare’s Sonnets-Study Guide
  2. Shakespeare’s Sonnets
  3. Shakespeare Sonnets
  4. The Elizabethan Sonnet Sequence
  5. Thematic Study of Shakespeare’s Sonnets
  6. Shakespeare’s Sonnet 1

 

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Menonimus
I am Menonim Menonimus, a Philosopher & Writer.

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